Q:

What is the shape of Mount Hekla?

A:

Mount Hekla is an active stratovolcano located in Iceland; and, its unique shape resembles an upside-down boat. A series of fissures runs across its 3.4 mile-long ridge, and are thought to resemble the boat's keel.

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Full Answer

According to NAT travel guides, the Hekla volcano has erupted dozens of times in recorded history. The most recent eruption occurring in 2000. In that eruption, a steam column rose to a height of 15 kilometers, and a pyroclastic flow of molten lava extended approximately 5 kilometers from the crater.

During the Middle Ages, Mount Hekla was known throughout Europe as one of two entrances to hell; the other was Stromboli, an active volcano off the coast of Southern Italy.

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