Q:

What does Article III of the Constitution deal with?

A:

Quick Answer

Article III of the U.S. Constitution deals with the establishment of the judiciary branch of the federal government. It also sets terms for judges, states rules for the hearing of different types of cases, and defines treason.

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Full Answer

Article III of the Constitution has three sections. The first section establishes the Supreme Court as the highest court in the United States. This section also outlines the terms for judges of both the Supreme Court and lower courts. It states that judges can serve as long as they remain on "good behavior," which generally means judges serve for life. It also sets the requirement that judges must be paid.

The second section deals with when and where cases are heard. This section states which cases must first be heard by the federal judiciary and which may be brought first to the Supreme Court. If the Supreme Court hears the case first, it is called original jurisdiction. This section states that all other cases heard by the Supreme Court are to be brought through appeal. It also guarantees trial by jury in criminal court.

The third section defines the crime of treason as levying war against or adhering to the enemies of the United States.

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