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What is the biography of Judge Andrew Napolitano?

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Widely known as Fox News’ Senior Judicial Analyst, Judge Andrew P. Napolitano is the youngest Superior Court judge ever appointed in New Jersey, as of 2014. Tenured for life, he sat on the bench from 1987-1995, leaving to pursue private practice. As of 2014, he is a distinguished visiting professor at the Brooklyn Law School, where he teaches constitutional law and jurisprudence.

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Born on June 6, 1950, in Newark, N.J., Judge Andrew P. Napolitano is a graduate of Princeton University and the University of Notre Dame School of Law. His professional experience includes work as a litigator in private practice and teaching law at Deleware Law School. While on the New Jersey Supreme Court bench, Napolitano tried more than 150 cases and sat in all parts of the Superior Court--criminal, civil, equity and family. One of Napolitano’s most important decisions was for the case "State v. Barcia," in which he ruled that random DWI checkpoints are unconstitutional under federal and New Jersey state law. For the case "In re KLF," he concluded that New Jersey’s Frivolous Pleading statute applies to the State as well as private litigants. Napolitato also decided the "Cusseaux v. Pickett" case, ruling that a woman abused by her husband can bring civil suit against him for Battered Woman’s Syndrome.

Not only the Senior Judicial Analyst for Fox News as of 2014, Napolitano is also the author of seven books on constitutional law. He also lectures on the U.S. Constitution, the rule of law, civil liberties in wartime and human freedom.

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