Can bill collectors call you at work?
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Q:

Can bill collectors call you at work?

A:

Quick Answer

A debt collector can call a person at work unless they have been told verbally or in writing that the debtor cannot take calls at work. However, the Federal Trade Commission protects consumers against bullying or calling at inappropriate times by bill collectors.

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Full Answer

Debt collectors are responsible for collecting money owed for mortgage, medical bills, credit card bills and other lines of credit. They have rules for calling at inconvenient times, such as early in the morning or late in the evening. They must be officially told to stop calling at the consumer's place of business, otherwise they do have the right to call.

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    The Fair Debt Collections Practices Act does not prohibit debt collectors from using different telephone numbers to call a debtor in an attempt to collect a debt. However, the law does prohibit bill collectors from calling a debtor repeatedly or using a false business name.

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    A:

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