Q:

Can a child legally move out at age 17?

A:

It may be possible to move out at 17, but it depends on a set of very defined circumstances according to Cornell Law School. In all states, minors under age 18 (or another age if 18 is not the age of majority in that state) can become emancipated from their parents if a court agrees to the emancipation.

Minors can petition the court for emancipation, and it is up to the court to decide if emancipation is in the child's best interests. Minors must be able to provide for themselves in most cases of emancipation. It is generally irreversible, and when granted, it severs the rights and responsibilities of the parents.

Sources:

  1. cornell.edu

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