Q:

Can a felony come off your record?

A:

Quick Answer

According to Felony Guide, under certain conditions, a felony can be expunged, or removed, from a person's criminal record. However, this will typical only apply at the state level. For federal background checks, a person's full criminal record check will still be taken into account.

 Know More

Full Answer

As ClearUpMyRecord.com explains, expunging a felony charge mostly just requires filling out a lot of legal paperwork. The official qualifications for expungement vary from state to state, but typically require a period of probation where no other crimes have been committed, only a single or small amount of offenses, a lower level of severity to the offense, and that the crime does not fit into certain categories (such as rape, child pornography and other sex crimes and crimes against minors).

Learn more about Law

Related Questions

  • Q:

    How long does a felony stay on your record?

    A:

    A felony stays on a person's criminal record forever, according to Attorneys.com. A person can apply to have a felony conviction expunged from their record. If the court rules that the conviction is to be expunged, the felony record is sealed.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is the difference between a revocable living trust and a will?

    A:

    Unlike a will, a revocable living trust avoids probate, does not become public record, and protects a person before his death as well as after, according to AARP. Individuals cannot name guardians or property managers for their children or name an executor in a revocable living trust.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What legal rights do squatters have?

    A:

    Squatter's rights confer ownership of real estate on a person who occupies someone else's property for a set amount of time, under certain conditions. The underlying legal principle is adverse possession, an idea that dates back hundreds of years to British Common Law, notes Mental Floss.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is a motion hearing in a criminal case?

    A:

    A motion hearing is the proceeding that a judge schedules for parties in a case, which could be a felony, misdemeanor, or other type of case, to orally argue their positions. The judge calls this proceeding in the event no ruling has been issued beforehand in response to a motion, and it affords the judge the opportunity to directly ask the parties any necessary questions. A motion is the formal request asking the judge to decide or act on a matter.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore