Q:

Can you join the Army if you have flat feet?

A:

Flat feet (pes planus) that are symptomatic or severe are a permanent disqualifying factor for military service, including service in the Army. It might be possible to join the Army if the condition doesn't cause any problems and aren't considered severe by the medical evaluation officer at the Military Entrance Processing Station.

Complete absence of a foot or part of a foot will also disqualify a candidate from admission to the military. Plantar fascitis, club foot and even some ingrown toenail conditions will also prevent a person from being able to serve.


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