Q:

Can I sue my landlord?

A:

Quick Answer

A tenant can sue a landlord for a number of different reasons, including getting the landlord to do small repairs, pressuring the landlord to follow through with any promises made in rental ads, and attempting to get a security deposit back. A landlord can be sued in small claims court.

Know More

Full Answer

Tenants have rights under the laws, and landlords are obligated to provide a safe place for someone to live, as well as reasonable rent. When a landlord reneges on a contract or promise, or fails to ensure adequate living arrangements for his tenants, the tenants have the right to ask a court to force the landlord to comply with the laws.

Learn more about Law
Sources:

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What are Indiana's eviction laws?

    A:

    In Indiana, a landlord must serve a notice to the tenant in regards to unpaid rent or violation of agreement terms, according to Laws.com. The tenant has 10 days to respond. If the matter is not remedied within the allotted timeframe, the landlord can file a complaint with the district court.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How do you get a court order to evict a tenant?

    A:

    A landlord can obtain a court order to evict a tenant by filing an unlawful detainer in superior courts, according to the California Department of Consumer Affairs. In most states, landlords cannot evict tenants without proper notice and a court order.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How much can I sue for?

    A:

    The amount that a person can sue for depends on the circumstances of the lawsuit. If suing in small claims court, the local jurisdiction has set laws regarding the amount one can sue for. Limits in district or state courts are much higher, says World Law Direct.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Can you sue someone for falsely accusing you?

    A:

    In most states, a person can sue someone else for falsely accusing them, according to The Law Firm of George H. Ramos Jr. In legal terms, falsely accusing someone of a crime is referred to as malicious prosecution.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore