Q:

Can a witness refuse to testify?

A:

Quick Answer

According to Legal Match, witnesses do not have to testify in court if they incriminate themselves by doing so or are involved in a privileged relationship that is recognized by the courts. In all other cases, witnesses must testify when called upon or be subject to legal consequences.

  Know More

Full Answer

There are a few types of relationships that can void the requirement to testify. A priest, for example, cannot testify to anything told to him during confession or counseling, and attorneys or doctors cannot be forced to testify against a client. Spouses also cannot be forced to testify against each other.

Learn more about Law
Sources:

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What is a pre-indictment hearing?

    A:

    A pre-indictment hearing is when the suspect or witness of a crime is called to testify in front of a grand jury. During a pre-indictment hearing, the individual is not allowed to have defense council present and must answer the questions of the prosecuting attorney.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is a no drop policy on domestic violence?

    A:

    A no-drop policy on domestic violence means that if a victim of domestic violence does not show up to court to testify against the defendant, the case is not dropped. Before no-drop policies were enacted in many areas, the result of a victim no-show meant a dismissal of the case.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Who can witness a signature?

    A:

    Laws vary based on the state and the purpose of the signature, but, in most cases, notaries public can witness any signatures except their own. When a notary public is not available, witnesses generally must be at least 18 years of age and of competent mind.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is the purpose of swearing in a witness?

    A:

    The purpose of swearing in a witness during a legal proceeding is to ensure the witness is telling the truth to the best of his ability. Statements made by witnesses while under oath are presumed to be truthful, and verdicts rendered by judges and juries often rely on witness testimony. If a witness knowingly lies while testifying under oath, the witness risks being charged with the crime of perjury.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore