Q:

What are the chapters for discharges from the Army?

A:

Quick Answer

"Chapters for discharges" refers to the legal reasons for administratively separating an enlisted soldier from the United States Army under the Uniform Code of Military Justice. The type of discharge the soldier receives can range from honorable to dishonorable.

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Full Answer

Enlisted soldiers sign contracts promising to serve for a certain number of years. Administrative separations usually occur if the soldier is unable to fulfill the terms of his enlistment. The reasons may include unsatisfactory entry level conduct, alcohol or drug rehabilitation failure or failure to meet body fat standards. A soldier may also receive an early separation due to mental illness, dependency or hardship, or to further her education.

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