Q:

What is a Class 6 felony in Virginia?

A:

A Class 6 felony in Virginia is a crime that meets the criteria for the "felony" category with the least of authorized punishments associated with it. Class 6 felony crimes in the state of Virginia include reckless endangerment and violation of a court order.

Penalties for the commission of Class 6 felony crimes in Virginia include imprisonment of no less than one but up to five years. Fines that do not exceed $2,500 can also be imposed on those who commit Class 6 felony crimes in Virginia.

Most felony cases in Virginia begin in the relevant general district court with arraignment. In Virginia, a plea is not required at arraignment.


Is this answer helpful?

Similar Questions

  • Q:

    What is a Virginia class U felony?

    A:

    In Virginia, a class U felony is a felony that is unclassified. This type of felony charge is for offenses that don't fall neatly under the first six official felony classes. A defendant may be charged with an unclassified felony for crimes such as grand larceny, robbery and rape. Some types of drug charges can also be considered unclassified. Fines and penalties under class U felonies vary.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is a class D felony?

    A:

    According to Criminal Defense Lawyer.com, a class D felony is a subset of the felony category which means that it's still a serious crime, but it's not quite as serious as a class A or B felony. Federal and state governments separate crimes into major crimes, or felonies, and minor crimes, or misdemeanors. Some states use a further classification to determine the severity of its felonies.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is a third degree felony in Texas?

    A:

    A third degree felony is a crime that carries a penalty of 2 to 10 years of imprisonment and a fine of up to $10,000. Some examples of third degree felonies in Texas include possession of 5 to 50 pounds of marijuana and a drive-by shooting with no injury.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is a "Felony 5" in Ohio?

    A:

    A fifth-degree felony in Ohio is a crime that, if convicted, carries a prison term of between six and 12 months and/or a fine of up to $2,500. Crimes that are considered class 5s in Ohio include illegal gambling, breaking and entering, and the exchange or possession of illegal items.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore