Q:

What is a Class E crime in Maine?

A:

According the State of Maine Judicial Branch, a Class E crime is the least serious type of offense in the Maine Criminal Code. Class E crimes are usually prosecuted in district court.

The State of Maine Judicial Branch explains that the Maine Criminal Code divides criminal offenses into categories from A-E according to the seriousness of the crime and the penalties. The only exception is murder, which has its own category and sentencing penalties.

Examples of Class E criminal offenses include operating under suspicion, disorderly conduct and theft of property not exceeding $1,000, according to State of Maine Judicial Branch. If an individual perpetrates one of these crimes, his penalty is not to exceed six months in prison or a $1,000 fine.

Sources:

  1. courts.maine.gov

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