Q:

What is a "code red" in the Marines?

A:

Quick Answer

"Code red" is one of several military slang terms for extrajudicial punishment. The term was a major plot point of the 1992 film "A Few Good Men," in which a character dies after receiving a code red.

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What is a "code red" in the Marines?
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Full Answer

Due to their illegal and secretive nature, it is difficult to determine how widespread a practice code reds may be and if and when they differ from hazing. They may be delivered for reasons ranging from shirking one's duty in the field to simply not fitting in with fellow Marines or soldiers. "A Few Good Men" is based on a real-life incident in which a Marine died under circumstances similar to those in the film.

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