What does "cop" stand for?
Credit:D.C.AttyCC-BY 2.0
Q:

What does "cop" stand for?

A:

Quick Answer

"Cop" is a shortened version of the word "copper." This slang term for police officers is derived from the verb use of "cop," meaning to take, steal or arrest.

 Know More

Full Answer

In the 19th century, the verb "cop" was used regularly to refer to the arrest of criminals by police officers. Eventually, the police officers were called "coppers," and, later, that was shortened to "cops." Other suggestions for the origins of the term "cop" have little support. For example, "cop" is not an abbreviation for "constable on patrol." It is also not a reference to large copper badges worn by some police officers of the late 19th century.

Learn more about Law Enforcement

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What is Voodoo?

    A:

    The word "Voodoo" is an anglicized version of the Haitian Creole word "Vodou." Vodou is a traditional Haitian religious belief system that was born out of the blending of cultures that resulted from African slaves being forced to practice Catholicism by French slave owners in the Caribbean.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How many times is "prayer" mentioned in the Bible?

    A:

    There are about 650 different prayers in the Bible but it is very difficult to get an exact number of how many times that the word "prayer" is referenced or mentioned in the Bible as every version is worded slightly differently.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is a "cop mustache"?

    A:

    A cop mustache, also known as the "military mustache" or "copstache," is a basic piece of facial hair worn between the upper lip and the nose that does not extend any further on the face. This style of facial hair is popular with members of police forces and the military because uniforms and dress codes do not often allow other types of facial hair to be worn.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How long can a cop follow you before he has to pull you over?

    A:

    Cops may follow drivers for as long as they wish without pulling them over. They must have probable cause to pull a vehicle over, such as for speeding, a broken tail light or failure to obey a traffic signal.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore