Q:

What does DDG mean on a Navy ship?

A:

Quick Answer

The U.S. Navy uses the letters DDG to classify a U.S. warship as a guided missile destroyer. A guided missile destroyer is a destroyer warship constructed to launch guided missiles.

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Full Answer

DDG is the NATO standard designation for guided missile destroyers. Guided missile destroyers are multi-mission surface combatants. Additionally, guided missile destroyers are capable of operating independently or as a part of a group.

Guided missile destroyers are equipped with guns and generally also have two large missile magazines to store the ship’s missiles. Some U.S. guided missile destroyers are equipped with powerful system radars, such as the Aegis combat system.

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