Q:

How do you define "moral culpability"?

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Quick Answer

"Moral culpability" is blame that is given to a person who understood that their actions and the consequences of those actions were evil at the time that the acts were committed. To be morally culpable, a person also has to have had control over the situation in which the act was committed.

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How do you define "moral culpability"?
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Full Answer

It is possible for people to commit evil acts but not be morally culpable, if they lack either understanding or control over their actions. For example, if a young child gave a person a poisonous substance to drink without understanding what would happen, they would not be considered morally culpable. Similarly, if a child soldier, even having reached the age of reason, is forced to commit evil acts under mortal danger to himself, his degree of moral culpability would be considerably diminished.

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