Q:

What is the definition of malicious damage?

A:

Quick Answer

Malicious damage is an act that intentionally or deliberately causes damage to personal, private or commercial property. Examples of malicious damage include vandalism and graffiti. Although malicious damage is a minor offense, there are severe penalties for acts associated with this offense.

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What is the definition of malicious damage?
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Full Answer

Malicious damage is any damage that is the result of a willful act with the purpose to harm or cause damage. An example of malicious damage is the graffiti in New York City subways or damage to a vehicle when the offender intentionally scratches it with a sharp object. Penalties for this crime depend on the severity of the offense.

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