Q:

What is the definition of scientific polling?

A:

Scientific polling consists of surveying a random sample of the population in order to obtain statistically significant results for an upcoming vote or election. Scientific polls are frequently used before a big election for countries or states. Polls are also sometimes used by corporations to test new products.

One of the most challenging aspects of a poll is having a truly random sample. If the sample is not representative of the population, the results will have a large margin of error. A truly scientific poll has a random sample as well as results for each option with a statistically calculated margin of error, which is small when conducted correctly.


Is this answer helpful?

Similar Questions

  • Q:

    How does a straw vote differ from a scientific poll?

    A:

    A straw poll denotes an unofficial poll taken to gauge general trends and opinions on an issue, whereas a scientific poll uses sampling controls, data collection and analysis to determine a statistical representation of a population. Perhaps the most prominent straw poll in America is the Ames Straw Poll in Iowa, a precursor to the presidential-selection process in the United States.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How does 538 aggregate polling?

    A:

    FiveThirtyEight, the statistics-driven website run by Nate Silver, aggregates polls by weighting them individually using his own formula that considers the sample size and the track record of the various polls with regards to accuracy. It also uses a 30-day half-life when weighing polls by date.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What was the outcome of Baker V. Carr?

    A:

    Baker v. Carr was a U.S. Supreme Court case in 1962 in which it was decided that the Tennessee legislation had to reapportion itself based on population. Before that, the last time that Tennessee had redistricted was in 1901.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is the median voter theorem?

    A:

    The median voter theorem, first proposed by Anthony Downs in 1957, holds that in a majority-rule voting system, the population chooses the outcome preferred by the median voter. This means that politicians who stray too far from the political center are likely to be voted out of office.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore