Q:

What is "deposition hearing"?

A:

Quick Answer

According to the law firm Eason and Tambornini, the term "deposition hearing" refers to a court-approved session during which time counsel may ask people involved in a case questions that must be answered under oath. During a deposition, a court reporter records the questions and answers.

Know More
What is "deposition hearing"?
Credit: Jon Feingersh The Image Bank Getty Images

Full Answer

People being questioned during a deposition may be represented by an attorney, if preferred. In general, the contents of a deposition may be used by either party during a trial or a hearing, as detailed by the Legal Information Institute at Cornell University Law School. Attorneys may object to the use of depositions during a hearing for a select number of reasons, including questions of competency.

Learn more about Law

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What is an example of a deposition?

    A:

    A deposition is a way for attorneys to question witnesses in a civil lawsuit in a setting outside of the courtroom. The type of questions that are asked are dependent upon the type of case that is pending.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Who administers the oath of office?

    A:

    The Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court administers the oath office for the President. The Speaker of the House administers the oath for Members of Congress. Each state chooses who administers the oath for state level elected officials.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is a default prove up hearing?

    A:

    A default "prove up" hearing is one in which the other party does not attend the hearing, but the plaintiff must still demonstrate the facts necessary to make his claim, according to the Law Offices of Stimmel, Stimmel & Smith. It is an exception to a general rule.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is a preliminary hearing?

    A:

    A preliminary hearing determines whether there is enough evidence to force an individual to stand trial, but it does not determine guilt or innocence. According to Nolo, a preliminary hearing allows both the prosecution and the defense to outline their cases, although the defense is not obligated to present information.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore