Q:

What determines state residency?

A:

Although it varies from state to state, what determines a person’s state residence boils down to the rights, laws and tax responsibilities they adhere to. These requirements often accompany a type of home or household on record with a government agency or private business. This, in turn, may even involve another contract or agreement. State residence is not just some information that reads from an identification card.

For proper state residency, a person has to actually live for a duration of time in the state to claim residence. This normally requires some type interaction with businesses through commerce and working or government from simply living in a state. Bona fide state residence requires that a person stay put and demonstrate having an actual domicile location. At times, these requirements meet challenges in courtrooms.

A big part of whether the government determines if a person resides in the state is the residence laws they have on record. Some of these laws determine where a person lives by where they pay their taxes as well as how long they live in the state. The length a state requires a person to live in a certain territory varies anywhere from six to 11 months.


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