Q:

What determines state residency?

A:

Quick Answer

Although it varies from state to state, what determines a person’s state residence boils down to the rights, laws and tax responsibilities they adhere to. These requirements often accompany a type of home or household on record with a government agency or private business. This, in turn, may even involve another contract or agreement. State residence is not just some information that reads from an identification card.

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Full Answer

For proper state residency, a person has to actually live for a duration of time in the state to claim residence. This normally requires some type interaction with businesses through commerce and working or government from simply living in a state. Bona fide state residence requires that a person stay put and demonstrate having an actual domicile location. At times, these requirements meet challenges in courtrooms.

A big part of whether the government determines if a person resides in the state is the residence laws they have on record. Some of these laws determine where a person lives by where they pay their taxes as well as how long they live in the state. The length a state requires a person to live in a certain territory varies anywhere from six to 11 months.

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