Q:

What did the Nuremberg Laws do?

A:

Quick Answer

The U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum explains that the Nuremberg Laws restricted the rights of German Jews. These laws forbade Jews from displaying the German flag or its colors, from employing female Aryans below age 45 as domestic workers, and from having sexual relations with or marrying Aryans of either gender. Couples who travelled outside of Germany to circumvent the marriage ban had their marriages nullified upon their return.

 Know More

Full Answer

The Nuremberg Laws were not Germany's first anti-Semitic laws. However, they paved the way for stricter legislation by defining the factors that determined who was racially Aryan and who was not. Using criteria described in the Nuremberg Laws and refined in subsequent decrees, the Third Reich bestowed citizenship only upon Aryans without any Jewish ancestors. The laws also placed severe restrictions on the rights of racial "half-bloods," those with some Jewish ancestry.

The Nuremberg Laws offer modern historians valuable information regarding German state-sponsored racism. The Third Reich's interest in Jews encompassed all ethnic Jews, regardless of their religious devotion or affiliation. Consequently, Jews who converted to Christianity were still Jewish in the government's eyes. Like their Jewish peers, these "half-bloods" were barred from the medical and legal professions. They were not permitted in Aryan hospitals and not allowed to work as journalists. Children were also severely affected by the Nuremberg Laws and were forcibly removed from public schools when they turned 14.

Learn more about Law

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What are my rights as a temporary employee?

    A:

    State and federal laws give temporary employees some of the same rights as other employees, including protection against discrimination. CBS News reminds temps that while on lease, they are employees of the agency. Discrimination is illegal, so companies cannot hire only select individuals, such as females in their 20s.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What was the result of the Nuremberg Trials?

    A:

    According to the Jewish Virtual Library, the Nuremberg trials resulted in 19 convictions of the 22 defendants on trial. Twelve received the death penalty, three received sentences of life imprisonment and the remaining four convictions resulted in sentences of 10 to 20 years. In addition, a 23rd defendant was found unfit to stand trial, while the 24th committed suicide before the proceedings began.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What are parity rights?

    A:

    Parity rights granted U.S. citizens and Filipinos equal rights in regard to using the natural resources of the Philippines. These parity rights were created through an amendment of the Philippine Constitution, called the Parity Amendment, which was voted through on March 11, 1947.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    In property law, what does "perpetual easement" mean?

    A:

    In the context of property law, perpetual easement is used to describe the rights entitled to a landowner to make limited use of his neighbor's land, such as crossing it to reach his own property, according to Dictionary.com. The site also notes that perpetual means that something that is never ending or has no limit regarding time.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore