What is an election?
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What is an election?

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Quick Answer

An election is a process where citizens vote to elect officials to office or vote on bills and amendments trying to be passed. Modern representative democracy has functioned on this system since the 17th century.

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Elections that are held to decide who will hold office are held at regular intervals, such as every 4 years for the president of the United States. Each state requires that residents register to vote to ensure that the elections cannot be tampered with. Each vote cast is done privately and tallied at the end of the voting day. The candidates with the most votes at the end of the elections is declared the winner. When voting on a bill or amendment, it is normally something that will affect the voters at a local level, like a bill on alcohol or local taxes.

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