Q:

Is an eviction public record?

A:

Quick Answer

The Tenant Resource Center notes that an eviction becomes public record when a judgment is entered by the court. Court records are public records and searchable, making eviction records public and available for viewing by potential landlords.

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Full Answer

The Minnesota Judicial Branch explains that there are some circumstances by which an eviction can be expunged from the tenant's record, removing it from public view. In Minnesota, to have an eviction expunged, the tenant must be able to show that the landlord had no legal basis for the eviction or that the eviction being expunged is in the best interests of justice. The eviction being expunged in the best interests of justice must outweigh the public interest in knowing the record. Eviction laws vary by state.

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