Q:

What is an example of a crime of omission?

A:

Quick Answer

Child neglect, manslaughter by gross negligence and failure to disclose terrorist acts are all crimes of omission. Crimes of omission occur when an individual fails to do what is required by law and someone else is harmed as a result.

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What is an example of a crime of omission?
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Full Answer

A person living in a home with a child is legally responsible for ensuring that the basic needs of that child are met either directly or through notification of authorities. Failure to act, even if the child is not biologically related, is a crime of omission. Likewise, any person who is aware of a dangerous situation, such as a house fire in progress or a terrorist plot, can face criminal charges for not notifying authorities.

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Related Questions

  • Q:

    What is the difference between an act of omission and the commission of an act?

    A:

    An instance showing the difference between an act of omission and the commission of an act is the difference in withholding the truth and voicing a lie. Both an act committed and an act of omission can change the result of a circumstance.

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    What is a pre-indictment hearing?

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    How do you file an expungement form?

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    An expungement form is usually filed at the court of jurisdiction where the applicant was arrested and charged with the crime in question, according to the Oregon State Police. Some states permit the application even in the event of a conviction, according to the Utah State Judiciary.

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    What was the outcome of Miranda vs Arizona?

    A:

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