Q:

What are some examples of non-traffic citations in Pennsylvania?

A:

Some examples of a non-traffic citation include disorderly conduct, loitering, harassment and low-level retail theft of items under $150, as of 2015. Non-traffic citations in Pennsylvania are also called summary offenses.

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Full Answer

While non-traffic citations count as criminal offenses, they generally fall under the lowest level possible. Non-traffic citations are given as a non-intrusive method of upholding the law in cases of very minor infractions that would not require an immediate arrest or any form of jail time. While these are citations that generally do not involve traffic, sometimes an officer may provide a summary offense for a related traffic incident such as obstructing a highway.

Some other examples of non-traffic citations or summary offenses are retail theft of items valued under $150 when it is the offender's first violation, harassment, criminal mischief, open lewdness, defiant trespassing and underage drinking. A person may also receive a non-traffic citation for vandalism when hammering a nail on a utility pole to post a sign, or for disobeying dog laws or damaging a shopping cart at a local supermarket. If a person scalps tickets at a sports game, an officer may also issue a summary offense for the unauthorized sale or transfer of tickets.

In most cases, a non-traffic citation, if convicted, results in only a fine. The offender may never have to attend court proceedings after receiving one.

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