Q:

What are examples of unfair labor practices?

A:

Unfair labor practices exist when an employer or union has violated an employee's right to improve his or her work conditions. Examples of unfair labor practices include, but are not limited to, prohibiting employees to organize or join a union or participate in collective bargaining, retaliation toward an employee for filing a grievance and conspiring with unions or employers to discriminate against an employee.

Examples of unfair labor practices initiated by an employer range from restraining employees from organizing union support and attempting to manipulate bargaining practices by providing illegal assistance or financial support to a union for personal or professional gain. Employers are also enacting unfair labor practices when they discipline employees for filing complaints, providing testimony to union representatives or if they dominate any aspect of union organizations.

Unions can also be in violation of labor practices. For example, it is considered an unfair labor practice for a union to strike or boycott for an illegal purpose. In addition, when unions threaten nonunion members or stop their ability to cross a picket line, the organization is in violation of fair labor practices. To remain fair and ethical, unions must also refrain from charging excessive membership fees or restraining a union member from representation.

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