Q:

What is an executor's deed?

A:

Quick Answer

An executor's deed is the deed used by an executor to transfer property to an heir out of the estate of a dead person who had written a will. The presence of the executor helps to prevent problems when future heirs inherit the property.

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Full Answer

The content of the deed includes the executor's name, the name of the deceased person, an account that the deed is performed according to the will, a description of the property and the executor's signature. Some states need the deed signed by a witness and notarized. The deed must be listed in the real estate records of the location where the property is found.

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    What is a quitclaim deed?

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    What is a "quitclaim deed" in Florida?

    A:

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    A:

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