Q:

What is fifth-degree theft?

A:

Fifth-degree theft is the least serious form of felony theft. Different states have different definitions and penalties for fifth-degree theft. Iowa, for example, considers stealing items valued at $200 or less to be fifth-degree theft, while Connecticut sets the bar at $250 to $500, as of 2014.

Fifth-degree theft is also known as "petty theft." Petty theft most often involves shoplifting, either intentionally or accidentally. Most states classify it as a misdemeanor. If one is convicted of petty theft in court, the conviction appears on the defendant's criminal record. Depending on the jurisdiction, it may be possible to have a fifth-degree theft conviction expunged from a criminal record by paying fines, taking classes or participating in community service.

Learn More

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What is the penalty for mail theft?

    A:

    Individuals found guilty of mail theft can be fined up to $2,000 or imprisoned for a period up to five years or both, according to the Cornell University Law School Legal Information Institute. Anyone who obtains or attempts to obtain mail from any source illegally is subject to the penalty, states USLegal.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is the penalty for employee theft?

    A:

    Employee theft is a civil tort and may result in heavy fines, prison or jail time, loss of job or restitution. The theft and punishment may be handled by the employee's company, local law enforcement or federal law enforcement.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is fourth-degree theft?

    A:

    Theft in the fourth degree is a serious misdemeanor in most states and does not carry a minimum sentence for first-time offenders. What constitutes fourth-degree theft differs from state to state, but it is typically based on a range of value for property taken that falls well below $1000.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What dollar amount constitutes a felony theft?

    A:

    The dollar amount that constitutes a felony theft varies by state. In Vermont, for instance, theft of property worth $250 is considered a felony as of 2014. In Wisconsin, however, the value of the property stolen must exceed $2,500 to be classified as a felony.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore