Q:

Who founded the Bloods gang?

A:

Quick Answer

The Bloods gang does not have a specific founder, but the Pirus gang teamed up with other street gangs to form a new group to resist the influence of the Crips. The Pirus gang, also known as the Piru Street Family, was originally a subgroup of the Crips, but it became its own group after an internal gang war in the 1970s.

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Full Answer

One of the gangs that combined with the Pirus was the Brims. The two sects recruited smaller Los Angeles groups who did not get along with the Crips. Red bandannas were adopted as the gang symbol of this new group. This gang has spread from Los Angeles to the east coast of the United States and Canada.

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