Q:

What is fourth-degree theft?

A:

Quick Answer

Theft in the fourth degree is a serious misdemeanor in most states and does not carry a minimum sentence for first-time offenders. What constitutes fourth-degree theft differs from state to state, but it is typically based on a range of value for property taken that falls well below $1000.

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Full Answer

The dollar value associated with theft in the fourth degree charge is generally low. Iowa's theft in the fourth degree charge involves property stolen whose value falls between $200 and $500. In Hawaii the value must be less than $100 for the stolen property. In Washington and Alaska the value is less than $50. Consult the laws particular to the state where the crime is committed to learn the particulars.

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