Q:

What happens after a deposition?

A:

Quick Answer

After a deposition, an attorney begins the process of analyzing the collected statements and preparing strategy for the case. Depending on the information given at a deposition, attorneys may discuss the case and decide to settle without the need for a trial as is observed on Avvo.com

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What happens after a deposition?
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Full Answer

A deposition often uncovers further possibilities for information, such as the name of another witness, who will then have to be deposed. The American Bar Association maintains a list of actions an attorney should take after a deposition such as: following up with opposing council, drafting a summary for the client, reviewing the testimony, and forwarding the information to expert witnesses.

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