Q:

What happens when a bond is revoked?

A:

According to Lawyers.com, when bond is revoked, any assets that are used to post the bond are sent to the state, and the defendant is apprehended by a bail bondsman. The Nest mentions that a defendant is either jailed or brought before the court.

Lawyers.com notes that a bondsman is responsible for locating the defendant. The court sends out a notice to the bondsman and defendant when a bond is revoked. Both parties are also given an opportunity to explain the violation of the bond, which may result in reinstatement. Legitimate excuses include illness, death or disability, but being incarcerated is not an excuse that courts generally accept.

The Nest mentions that a person who posted bail can have it revoked in cases where a defendant may violate the bond agreement or commit a crime. This is done by contacting the bail bondsman. The bond is then revoked after all fees and information are given to the bondsman.


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