Q:

What happens when a court case is adjourned?

A:

Quick Answer

When a court case is adjourned, it is postponed either indefinitely, until a later date or definitely in anticipation of a dismissal. When the court case has an adjournment that is final, it is said to be "sine die."

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Full Answer

Court cases can be adjourned at any time of the proceedings, such as the pre-trial conference, motion or trial. Reasons for adjournment can be schedule conflicts, unavailability of any of the parties involved or irregularities in procedures. Court cases are also adjourned at the end of each work day. If a case is adjourned with no date set, the parties must schedule an appropriate time themselves.

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