Q:

What happens to criminals who flee a state to avoid punishment?

A:

Quick Answer

According to the Findlaw Blotter, criminals who flee a state to avoid punishment have a warrant issued for their arrest, and the statute of limitations for the crime is not affected by fleeing. The fleeing criminal's reputation also may be damaged due to their mug shot being shared across social media by various law enforcement agencies.

Know More
What happens to criminals who flee a state to avoid punishment?
Credit: Tricia Shay Photography Photolibrary Getty Images

Full Answer

The Findlaw Blotter points out a number of other possible effects for criminals and alleged criminals who flee a state to avoid punishment. One such possibility is the use of bounty hunters to track the criminal down. Bounty hunters are legally authorized to hunt fleeing criminals and also have a financial incentive to catch them, so fleeing criminals should be aware that this increases the number of interested parties who are hunting them down.

Additionally, depending on the state to which the criminal has fled, they may face extradition back to the jurisdiction of the original crime. In order to extradite, the state must provide evidence that the criminal deliberately fled in order to avoid punishment. Anyone considering fleeing a state to escape punishment should have a conversation with a lawyer so they are fully versed in how factors such as extradition would affect their situation.

Learn more about Crime

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What is the statute of limitations on fraud?

    A:

    Many types of federal fraud cases carry a statute of limitations of five years, but some specific instances differ. According to the Pillsbury law firm, 28 U.S.C. Section 2462 limits the time within which an “action, suit or proceeding for the enforcement of any civil fine, penalty or forfeiture” may be brought to “five years from the date when the claim first accrued” in government lawsuits seeking civil penalties.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is the statute of limitations for a bank robbery?

    A:

    Under federal law, the statute of limitations for bank robbery is five years. After this time has passed, those involved in such crimes cannot be tried at the federal level, though additional state laws may result in charges with longer statutes.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is the California statute of limitations for a felony?

    A:

    The statute of limitations for a felony in California varies by sentencing guidelines. LegalTips.org states that if a defendant is facing eight or more years of prison time, there is a six-year statute of limitations. If the felony carries a sentence of up to three years, the state has three years to prosecute. Embezzling public funds and crimes punishable by life in prison without parole have no statute of limitations.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is the statute of limitations for credit card fraud?

    A:

    According to U.S. federal law the statute of limitations for credit card fraud is five years. After this time period it is impossible for the government to prosecute a credit card fraud offense.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore