What happens if you lie under oath?
Credit:FuseGetty Images
Q:

What happens if you lie under oath?

A:

Quick Answer

If you lie in a sworn statement or under oath in a court of law, you commit perjury and can face criminal charges, according to FindLaw, a leader in online legal services and information. Under federal and state laws, penalties include fines, probation or imprisonment for up to five years. If you are in law enforcement, public service or in service to the courts and convicted of perjury, your employment can be terminated.

 Know More

Full Answer

Because eye-witness testimony can lead to unintentional false testimony, intent is key in prosecuting perjury cases, notes FindLaw. If a witness gives a description and an account of a crime that is later proven to be incorrect, this does not necessarily mean the witness intentionally lied under oath. Some examples of perjury include testifying in court that you were with someone when you know you were not, deliberately excluding income on your signed income tax return and willfully lying on a sworn affidavit. To be convicted of perjury, it must be proven in a court of law that you intentionally deceived the court in a statement made under oath or by knowingly signing a fraudulent document. FindLaw recommends that if you lied under oath or are concerned about discrepancies in your testimony to contact a criminal defense attorney.

Learn more about Crime

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What is family law?

    A:

    Family law addresses the rules, regulations and court processes involving the family unit, according to an article on FindLaw. As such, family law deals with marriage, divorce, property obligations, paternity, and child custody and support. It also handles adoption, guardianship, domestic partnerships, foster care, emancipation and reproductive rights.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is an attorney letter of representation?

    A:

    An attorney letter of representation is a document that authorizes a lawyer to represent a client in certain legal matters and/or in a court of law, notes FindLaw, a legal website serviced by Thomson Reuters. The letter of representation serves as a contract that outlines the terms of the attorney-client relationship.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is the penalty for involuntary manslaughter?

    A:

    The penalty for involuntary manslaughter varies widely by state but usually carries a minimum sentence of 12 months in prison plus fines and probation, according to FindLaw. Involuntary manslaughter is considered a felony in all jurisdictions of the United States. Most states base their sentencing guidelines on Federal law, which requires a prison sentence of 12 to 16 months with increased penalties for extremely reckless and automobile-related manslaughter.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is the punishment for burglary of a habitation in Texas?

    A:

    As of 2014, the punishment for burglary of a habitation in Texas is a sentence of two to 20 years in state prison and a fine of up to $10,000, according to FindLaw. Burglary of a habitation is a felony of the second degree, the most serious classification of burglary.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore