Q:

What is an independent witness?

A:

An independent witness is a third-party witness who does not have an affiliation with either parties involved in a case and someone who can present an unbiased opinion, as noted by Cornell University. Independent witnesses do not have anything invested in the outcome of a case, meaning the witness will not profit from the results of the case.

An example of an independent witness would be someone who sees a car accident happens, but is not involved in any way in the accident. The witness can present the facts pertaining to the case as a third party and provide the proof needed to identify who was at fault in an accident.


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