Q:

What is judicial power?

A:

Quick Answer

Judicial power involves constitutional authority assigned to courts and judges, according to the Free Dictionary. The authority enables them to interpret and apply the law, arbitrate legal disputes and carry out justice.

Know More
What is judicial power?
Credit: Mark Wilson Getty Images News Getty Images

Full Answer

The United States judiciary is composed of a system of state and federal courts, tribunals and administrative bodies, as well as the judges and other judicial officials who oversee them, according to the Free Dictionary. Federal judges and a small percentage of state judges are appointed to their positions for life. Many judges acting in state and local governmental positions are elected by the people for a definitive term.

The U.S. Supreme Court has the greatest judiciary power, according to YourDictionary.com. This branch of the judiciary system is not bound by any higher court’s precedent and can actually change precedents and interpret Constitutional law.


Is this answer helpful?

Similar Questions

  • Q:

    How can the judicial branch check the legislative branch?

    A:

    Once passed by the legislature and signed into law by the president, the people of the United States can challenge any law in the courts under the authority of the judicial branch. Laws deemed unconstitutional by the judiciary are considered void. In this way, justices of the courts become the final arbiters of the fairness and legality of a law's provisions.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Which courts make up the national judicial branch?

    A:

    The courts that make up the national federal court system includes the Supreme Court of the United States, the U.S. district courts, the U.S. courts of appeals, the U.S. bankruptcy courts and the U.S. courts of special jurisdiction. The U.S. Supreme Court is the highest court in the country.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What are examples of concurrent powers?

    A:

    Some examples of concurrent powers are the power to tax, to build roads, to borrow money and to create courts. Other such powers include making and enforcing laws, chartering banks and corporations, and usurping property with proper compensation to the owner. Concurrent powers are those powers that both the federal and the state governments in the United States (and other federalist countries) have in common with one another.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is the primary role of the judicial branch?

    A:

    The judicial branch helps to set and clarify rules to maintain a balance in power and control between the executive branch and legislative branch, which are the other two branches of United States government. The federal government contains three main branches of government, which perform separate but complementary and equally important roles. The U.S. Constitution lays out the specific duties and obligations held by the three branches of government and within the judicial branch lies the power to use judicial review to interpret rules, particularly in the areas of criminal and civil law.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore