Q:

What are the laws about neighbors playing music too loud?

A:

Quick Answer

Many communities have local ordinances that prohibit excessive, unnecessary, and unreasonable noise, and a person can pursue a nuisance abatement lawsuit against noisy neighbors. A person can sue a noisy neighbor in small claims court to stop the noise from continuing by court order, as stated by Nolo.com.

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What are the laws about neighbors playing music too loud?
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Full Answer

Winning a nuisance abatement lawsuit requires strong proof that the noise is excessive and disturbing a person's ability to enjoy her home in peace, notes Nolo.com. The Housing and Community Development Network of New Jersey reports that a legal nuisance is one that greatly interferes with someone's enjoyment of their own property. The nuisance could also pose a risk to health and safety. Local ordinances should be reviewed to see what specific laws are broken.

Sometimes the issue of playing music too loud can be resolved between neighbors without filing a lawsuit. The Chicago Tribune recommends starting with a polite request for the neighbor to stop the disturbing noise. Another tactic is to send a strongly worded letter from a lawyer. This type of legal notice is highly effective in solving nuisance issues. The police can also be called in, and a police report filed. If all attempts to get the neighbor to stop the noise fail, filing a lawsuit may be the final remedy.


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