Q:

What does legal signature mean?

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Quick Answer

A legal signature is one which indicates the signer's intent to comply with the terms of a contract. This signature can be either physical or electronic; the only requirement is that the signature be both voluntary and legitimate.

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Full Answer

Electronic signatures gained official legal recognition with the passage of the Electronic Signatures in Global and National Commerce Act of 2000, or E-Sign Act. Some types of contract, such as a will or prenuptial agreement, must be signed in the presence of at least two witnesses, and all signatures made by illiterate persons must be witnessed in order to gain the weight of law.

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Related Questions

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    What is counteroffer in contract law?

    A:

    According to Law.com, the party who proposes a counteroffer seeks to revise the terms of a proposed contract without halting negotiations. Legally, a counteroffer is a rejection of the contract. When a counteroffer is given, several outcomes are possible. The options are for all parties to agree to the revised terms, for one side to submit another counteroffer, or for one side to reject the offer completely.

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  • Q:

    How do you cancel an contract agreement?

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    When cancelling a contract agreement, one should look over the terms and conditions of the contract to review which circumstances are necessary for one-party and dual-party termination. One must draft a clear and concise letter stating the reasons for terminating the contract, setting a clear timeline, says the Law Dictionary.

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    What does the legal term "disposed" mean?

    A:

    The Free Dictionary gives the legal definition of "disposed" as apportioned or distributed. US Legal further explains that dispose means to attend or settle a situation.

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  • Q:

    What does the legal term "stayed and imposed" mean?

    A:

    "Stayed and imposed" means that a criminal court judge imposes a sentence but stays that sentence, meaning that the convict does not immediately serve the sentence. If the convict abides by certain conditions imposed by the judge, the sentence is then be set aside, according to attorney Sydne French.

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