Q:

What is legislative power?

A:

Legislative power is the ability to make laws. In the United States, the constitution grants the power to make laws to make federal laws to Congress.

In the United States, Congress is comprised of the Senate and the House of Representatives. Each of these is comprised of elected officials from the 50 states.The number of representatives for each state in the House of Representatives is determined by each state's respective population. Regardless of population, each state elects two senators to the Senate. Once a bill is introduced into Congress, it is reviewed by one of the 70 Senate subcommittees. If the bill is passed by the subcommittee, it goes on to one of the 17 Senate full committees. Once a bill is approved by the committee, it goes to the floor of Congress for a vote. Only a majority of votes is needed to pass a bill into law. Most bills undergo a lot of revision on the way to becoming law. The President of the United States also has the ability to veto all or part of a bill if he does not approve of it. Congress may still pass the law, however, if a two-thirds majority of both the House of Representatives and the Senate agree to do so.


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