Q:

What is legislative power?

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Quick Answer

Legislative power is the ability to make laws. In the United States, the constitution grants the power to make laws to make federal laws to Congress.

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Full Answer

In the United States, Congress is comprised of the Senate and the House of Representatives. Each of these is comprised of elected officials from the 50 states.The number of representatives for each state in the House of Representatives is determined by each state's respective population. Regardless of population, each state elects two senators to the Senate. Once a bill is introduced into Congress, it is reviewed by one of the 70 Senate subcommittees. If the bill is passed by the subcommittee, it goes on to one of the 17 Senate full committees. Once a bill is approved by the committee, it goes to the floor of Congress for a vote. Only a majority of votes is needed to pass a bill into law. Most bills undergo a lot of revision on the way to becoming law. The President of the United States also has the ability to veto all or part of a bill if he does not approve of it. Congress may still pass the law, however, if a two-thirds majority of both the House of Representatives and the Senate agree to do so.

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Related Questions

  • Q:

    What is the legislative branch of government?

    A:

    The legislative branch is the branch of government that is responsible for making laws. The branch consists of the House of Representatives and the Senate, which form Congress.

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  • Q:

    What is the purpose of the legislative branch?

    A:

    The legislative branch of any government exists to create, amend and repeal laws that provide structure and order to a society. In the United States, it is called the Congress. According to Article 1 of the Constitution, only Congress may enact legislation or declare war.

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  • Q:

    What is the role of the legislative branch?

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    The legislative branch has various roles in the United States, including drafting and passing bills that become law with presidential approval, rejecting or approving presidential appointments and foreign treaties, representing the interests of U.S. citizens, declaring war and holding hearings that influence policymaking. The two bodies of this bicameral legislative branch, the Senate and the House of Representatives, have slightly different rights and responsibilities. For example, the House of Representatives is the only legislative body with the right to declare war, but the Senate can approve or reject treaties, a right the House does not share.

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  • Q:

    What is the definition of legislative leader?

    A:

    A legislative leader is a presiding elected officer of every house, the Speaker of the House and the President of the Senate. The exact roles and responsibilities of legislative leaders differ among states.

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