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What is a lie of omission?

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Quick Answer

A lie of omission is a lie in which someone deliberately withholds pertinent details about something in order to skew someone else's idea of the truth or engender a misconception. Although a lie of omission is not technically a lie because it contains no false information, it is still referred to as one colloquially because it is deliberately misleading.

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What is a lie of omission?
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Lies of omission can occur over both the short and long term. For example, if a car salesman says that a car is regularly inspected yet neglects to say that a major defect was revealed upon the last inspection, he commits a lie of omission in the short term. If a cashier regularly steals money from the cash register yet never informs his boss because his boss never directly asks him about it, he commits a lie of omission in the long term.

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