Q:

How long does it take to serve court papers?

A:

Quick Answer

The time required to serve court papers varies between the process server chosen and whether an expedited service, such as same-day service, is used or not, states ServeNow. Many process servers offer faster turnaround times for higher costs.

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Full Answer

Some examples of different speeds of service are same-day service, in which the papers are served on that same day; rush service, which typically takes a couple of days; or routine service, which can be five to seven business days depending on the schedule of the process server, according to ServeNow. A process server should be able to provide his rates for the different speeds of service.

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