Q:

What is a menacing charge?

A:

Quick Answer

According to US Legal, a menacing charge arises when a person displays a weapon or conduct, such as stalking, that intentionally places another person in fear of physical injury or death. The charges and sentences vary by state.

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Full Answer

Menacing in the second degree, according to US Legal, is when someone intentionally places another person in fear of injury or death, repeatedly follows another person or repeatedly commits acts that place another person in fear of injury or death. It is a Class A misdemeanor.

According to US Legal, a person is guilty of menacing in the first degree if he commits menacing in the second degree and has been convicted of menacing within the past 10 years. It is a Class E felony.

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