Q:

What is a moving traffic violation?

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Quick Answer

A moving traffic violation is any violation of driving laws that occurs while a vehicle is in motion, according to USLegal. Moving violations vary considerably by jurisdiction. Common moving violations include drunk driving, failure to stop at a traffic light or stop sign, speeding, failure to yield to a vehicle that has the right of way and reckless driving. Parking, equipment and paperwork violations do not fall into this category.

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Full Answer

While the rules regarding moving violations vary by state, most moving violations that do not carry the risk of jail time are considered minor violations, according to esurance.com. Minor moving violations include tickets for improper turns, disobeying traffic signals and lights, illegal u-turns and seat belt violations. These types of offenses are typically handled in traffic court. Major moving violations are considered more serious crimes and include driving while intoxicated, driving under the influence, hit-and-run and vehicular manslaughter. Major moving violations are commonly prosecuted in criminal courts as misdemeanor or felony offenses and carry with them large fines, loss of driving privileges and, in some cases, jail time. Moving violations appear on the driving record once received, though some states allow the violation to be removed once the ticket is paid, it is contested in court or the recipient attends a defensive driving course or traffic school.

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