Q:

How much can I sue for?

A:

The amount that a person can sue for depends on the circumstances of the lawsuit. If suing in small claims court, the local jurisdiction has set laws regarding the amount one can sue for. Limits in district or state courts are much higher, says World Law Direct.

According to The Peoples' Lawyer, most small claims courts limit the amount of money that a person can sue for to around $5,000 to $10,000 dollars. Some courts even set limits on the amount of lawsuits over a specific amount an individual can claim annually. Litigants in small claims court may not be represented by an attorney.


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