Q:

Who must approve all appointments to the Supreme Court?

A:

The approval process for the U.S. Supreme court is twofold, with the President nominating a candidate and the Senate confirming the nominee. This process is required by the U.S. Constitution.

Once the president names a candidate for a Supreme Court vacancy, the Senate holds committee hearings on the nomination. The hearings generally focus on the nominee's qualifications and past judicial decisions. After the hearings finish, the full Senate takes an up-or-down vote on the nomination. If the candidate receives a majority of the votes cast, he is confirmed. The nominee becomes an official member of the court when he takes the oath of office at a swearing-in ceremony.

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