Q:

Where is the nearest fire hydrant to my house?

A:

To find the nearest fire hydrant to a home or business, a request may be made in writing to local Emergency Service representatives; this letter is called a "Request for Letter of Protection." As of 2014, there is no definitive way to find a fire hydrant.

In Florida and across the United States, the Bureau of Safety Services is mapping out the locations of fire hydrants through GPS tracking. This is done by manually locating each and every fire hydrant and using GPS to mark its coordinates.

There is also the adopt-a-hydrant program that is being developed in certain states, such as North Carolina. This program has volunteers track down fire hydrants and help with maintenance.


Is this answer helpful?

Similar Questions

  • Q:

    How much does a fire hydrant weigh?

    A:

    As of 2014, a fire hydrant weighs a minimum of 500 pounds. Older hydrants used by firemen in the city of New York between 1904 and the 1930s weighed up to 800 lbs. Digging up a fire hydrant may cost between $2,000 and $4,000.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is a house fire temperature?

    A:

    Most house fires burn at an average of 1,100 degrees Fahrenheit, according to the Livesafe Foundation. This temperature varies according to the source of the fire, the items burned in the fire and many other factors.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Why are fire engines red?

    A:

    There are several theories about why fire engines are red. One theory suggests that fire trucks were first painted red back in the 1800s when fire brigades took so much pride in their trucks that they wanted them to stand out and feature the most regal and expensive color, which at the time was red.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is a fire command station?

    A:

    The Free Dictionary defines a fire command station as the principal location where the statuses of a fire detection system, an alarm system and a communications-and-control system are displayed and from which all systems can be manually controlled. Each state in the U.S. has its own codes and regulations regarding fire command stations and fire safety.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore