Q:

What are non-extradition states?

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Quick Answer

No states in the United States are non-extradition states. All states have the right under federal and state laws to extradite criminals. If a person is arrested in one state, he may be sent to another state to face charges in the second state.

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Full Answer

The Extradition Clause of the Constitution (article IV, section 2) says that "a person charged in any State with Treason, Felony, or other Crime, who shall flee from Justice, and be found in another State, shall on Demand of the executive Authority of the State from which he fled, be delivered up, to be removed to the State having Jurisdiction of the Crime." Most states are required by law to inform a person of an extradition request, the charges in the second state and his right to legal counsel.

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