Q:

What does "notwithstanding the foregoing" mean?

A:

Quick Answer

"Notwithstanding the foregoing" means in spite of what was just said or written. The word "notwithstanding" means in spite of or despite. The word "foregoing" means what has come earlier.

 Know More

Full Answer

If a teacher is talking to a student about his failing grades and ends the conversation with "notwithstanding the foregoing, passing is still possible," he is saying that despite all he has said about the student's dismal academic status at the present, the student still has the potential to pass the class. "Notwithstanding the foregoing" is a transitional phrase that indicates the speaker or writer is about to give a different spin on a situation.

Learn more about Law

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What is an affidavit used for?

    A:

    According to the Legal Information Institute of the Cornell University Law School, one common use for affidavits is as a means of presenting evidence in court. An affidavit is a declaration of facts that is made willingly and given under oath.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How do you remove media usage rights?

    A:

    Media usage rights cannot be removed by any means except via permission of the owner of the original media or the individual to whom the rights have been transferred. Media usage rights are the implementation of the owner's restrictions on how consumers can use files for which they purchased a license, according to Microsoft.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How do you disown someone?

    A:

    There are both formal and informal means of disowning an adult family member (that is, a family member who has reached the age of legal majority in his state). When one of the interested parties is a minor, it is advisable to consult with a family-law lawyer because paperwork and court hearings are required.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is the difference between natural law and positive law?

    A:

    According to the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, natural law refers to those laws that derive their legitimacy from moral reasoning and are based on what is believed to serve the best interests of the common good while positive laws are those that obtain their legitimacy through legislative means and are enforced by civil or political authority. Based on a strict interpretation of natural law, any legal statute that conflicts with natural law is unjust and should not be obeyed. According to positive legal theory, the legitimacy of a law is not relevant to its morality, but rather stems from the power of the authority that enacted it.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore