Q:

How does one report food stamp fraud?

A:

Quick Answer

Food stamp fraud is reported to the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Office of the Inspector General by telephone, mail, or email. Fraud can also be reported to your state's food stamp office.

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Full Answer

  1. Find the contact information for the USDA's Office of the Inspector General

    The telephone numbers, mailing address and email address can be found on the USDA's website as well as on literature distributed by the agency.

  2. Contact the USDA

    Either make a telephone call to the Inspector General's office, write a letter, or compose and send an email.

  3. Continue to be vigilant

    Keep and eye out for and continue to report possible food stamp fraud.

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